Loading…
Attending this event?
PLEASE NOTE: All On-Demand sessions will not actually take place at the date and time below, we will be sending out access to these sessions the Monday before the conference starts and they will be available to watch on your own time for a month after the conference!

**This Agenda is Subject to Change**

Sign up or log in to bookmark your favorites and sync them to your phone or calendar.

Thursday, February 10
 

10:00am CST

Workshop 1: Hearing Protector Fit-Testing
Hearing protector fit testing can help employers improve employee protection and prevent noise-induced hearing loss.  Many evidenced-based benefits have led professional organizations, regulatory agencies, standards bodies, and employers to recognize hearing protector fit testing as a best practice.  With today’s technology, employers can easily implement hearing protector fit testing for their workers.



Speakers
avatar for Laurie Wells, Au.D

Laurie Wells, Au.D

Lead Regulatory Affairs Specialist, 3M
Laurie Wells, Au.D., is a board certified audiologist and Lead Regulatory Affairs Specialist with 3M Personal Safety Division, where she works with hearing protection and hearing conservation program regulatory issues globally.  Her responsibilities include supporting evidenced-based... Read More →
avatar for William Murphy, Ph.D.

William Murphy, Ph.D.

Coordinator, Hearing Loss Prevention, CDC NIOSH
CAPT William J. Murphy is the coordinator for the Hearing Loss Prevention cross sector for National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. He works in the Division of Field Studies and Engineering, Engineering and Physical Hazards Branch, and the Noise and Bioacoustics Team... Read More →


Thursday February 10, 2022 10:00am - 12:00pm CST
Virtual

10:00am CST

Workshop 2: Hearing Health “Boothless” Audiometry Workshop
A sound booth has been the gold standard of equipment needed to conduct hearing conservation and audiological examinations. However, the sound booth requires substantial square footage and a trained, on-site hearing health professional. Over the past decade, several companies have worked to develop novel platforms to enable hearing assessment outside of the sound booth, to improve accessibility as well as efficiency. Effective solutions must include capabilities to meet additional requirements for specialty populations and markets, including foreign and domestic militaries as well as U.S. veterans. Expanded awareness and knowledge of boothless technologies is needed to inform and accelerate adoption and application of boothless audiometry to hearing health services. However, it can be challenging to track technological advancements in boothless audiometry products. This workshop will present an overview of boothless audiometry technologies currently available to the hearing conservation professional. In the first part of the session, participants will learn about requirements for military, veteran, occupational workers, and civilians. It will also include overview presentations from participating boothless audiometry representatives. The second part of the session will include hands-on demonstrations of specific devices, allowing participants to become familiar with each system and how it can be used for hearing conservation services.

Speakers
KG

Kathy Gates, AuD

Department of Defense (DOD) Hearing Center of Excellence (HCE)
Dr. Kathy Gates joined the Defense Hearing Center of Excellence (HCE) in October 2012 and is currently working under the Prevention Branch. One of her primary roles is to work on launching the Comprehensive Hearing Health Program to Audiology and Hearing Conservation/Program Clinics... Read More →


Thursday February 10, 2022 10:00am - 2:30pm CST
Virtual

12:30pm CST

Workshop 3: Speech communication and situational awareness in loud environments – How deep learning could improve face-to-face communication while wearing hearing protection
Many hearing protection devices (HPDs) offer ‘hear-through’ for natural communication. This can be useful when the environment changes between loud noises and communication situations and potentially increases acceptance for wearing HPDs. However, the benefit of hear-through is still very limited in noisy conditions because both speech and noise are transmitted. With the advent of machine learning technologies such problems could be overcome. This contribution introduces advanced algorithms to segregate speech and noise for applications in HPDs. These algorithms use deep neural networks to perform so-called “blind source separation” to output an estimated version of the speech and of the noise. We will illustrate the potential of such algorithms by systematic analyses and audio examples for several industrial noises. In some applications, only the estimated speech could be transmitted to maximize intelligibility. In other applications, it is desirable not to entirely remove the noise to maintain situational awareness. In such cases, the estimated speech and noise can be “re-mixed” at more favorable speech-to-noise ratios. The processing can be implemented to maintain natural interaural level differences, which are critical for acoustic localization. The importance of these interaural parameters and exemplary limitations of current HPDs to provide these parameters will be discussed.

Speakers
avatar for Jan Rennies-Hochmuth, Dr.rer.nat.

Jan Rennies-Hochmuth, Dr.rer.nat.

Head of Group Personalized Hearing Systems, Fraunhofer Institute for Digital Media Technologies IDMT


Thursday February 10, 2022 12:30pm - 2:30pm CST
Virtual

3:00pm CST

Hot Topic Round Tables
Thursday February 10, 2022 3:00pm - 5:30pm CST
Virtual

5:30pm CST

Opening Networking Session
Thursday February 10, 2022 5:30pm - 6:30pm CST
Virtual
 
Friday, February 11
 

9:30am CST

Welcome Remarks and Keynote Address
Animal Audiology: a new day for conservation
In this presentation the new role of “Animal Audiologists” at the world renown FETCHLAB USA will be introduced. The new “animal audiology” role will be described as it relates to domestic and exotic animal care and protection. This will include topics such as noise effects on domestic dogs, current audiological research with African elephants to assist in mitigation of the human/elephant conflict in Africa, noise impacts on Reindeer in Alaska.

Speakers
avatar for Peter Scheifele

Peter Scheifele

Professor & Founder/ Executive Director, FETCHLAB


Friday February 11, 2022 9:30am - 10:30am CST
Virtual

10:30am CST

2022 update on the Apple Hearing Study
The Apple Hearing Study is a study being conducted by the University of Michigan and Apple Inc. The study, which launched in November 2019, involves volunteer adults in the United States, and is collecting data on participants’ environmental sound exposures, headphone listening levels, and hearing ability. We have recently added additional measures to our ongoing longitudinal study. To date, we have measured >200 million hours of environmental noise and headphone audio exposures among our participants. Our results suggest that many participants in our study have the potential to be exposed to sound levels that exceed the World Health Organization recommended limits. Additionally, our participants complete regular pure tone audiometric tests and speech in noise tests, evaluations of potential temporary threshold shifts following high noise exposure, a tinnitus matching activity, and a variety of surveys assessing aspects of hearing and general health, behaviors, and knowledge. Going forward, we will compute combined exposures, i.e., exposures that integrate environmental noise data and headphone listening data. This will allow us to create, for the first time ever, national-level estimates of total daily noise exposure that include environmental and headphone exposures. We will then evaluate these levels against changes in hearing among those participants.

Speakers
avatar for Richard Neitzel, PhD, CIH, FAIHA

Richard Neitzel, PhD, CIH, FAIHA

Professor, University of Michigan
Richard L. Neitzel, PhD, CIH, FAIHA is a Professor of Environmental Health Sciences and Global Public Health at the University of Michigan (UM) School of Public Health. He has published >120 peer-reviewed manuscripts focused on exposures to, and impacts of, noise and other occupational... Read More →


Friday February 11, 2022 10:30am - 11:00am CST
Virtual

11:00am CST

Sponsor Ignite Presentation
Friday February 11, 2022 11:00am - 12:00pm CST
Virtual

12:15pm CST

Localization of backup alarms with level-dependent HPDs in individuals with hearing impairment
Backup alarms are often mandatory on heavy vehicles. This presentation focuses on the benefits of the broadband versus the tonal alarm for sound localization, and the effects of both hearing loss and level-dependent HPDs. When using a short signal duration, percent correct identification of the source (8AFC) was about twice higher for the broadband alarm than for the tonal alarm in normal-hearing individuals not wearing HPDs. Hearing protection, particularly earmuffs, had a deleterious effect on sound localization and level-dependent HPDs did not restore performance to unprotected levels. Using a longer signal, sound localization was measured without HPDs, and with level-dependent earmuffs and earplugs. For both alarms, accuracy in normal-hearing individuals was highest without hearing protection and only slightly affected by HPDs, except when earmuffs were used in their passive mode. While a similar trend was noted in the hearing-impaired group, performance in most listening conditions was lower than in the normally-hearing group. Results show that the broadband alarm remains the best choice for a backup alarm when sound localization is critical, but care must be exercised in the selection of HPDs. (Co-Authors: Christian Giguère, Véronique Vaillancourt, Mohamad Ghaith, Celina Khouri, Philippe Auclair, Rachel Saraya, Hugues Nélisse)

Speakers
avatar for Chantal Laroche, Ph.D.

Chantal Laroche, Ph.D.

Full Professor, University of Ottawa
Chantal Laroche, Ph.D., is a Professor in Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology at the University of Ottawa. She has obtained funding from many Canadian government agencies in collaboration with colleagues in psychology and engineering. She has published in excess of 100 scientific... Read More →


Friday February 11, 2022 12:15pm - 12:45pm CST
Virtual

12:45pm CST

Impact of Military Noise Exposure on Hearing Loss, Tinnitus and Subjective Hearing Difficulties in Service Members and Veterans using the Lifetime Exposure to Noise and Solvents Questionnaire
The Lifetime Exposure to Noise and Solvents Questionnaire (LENS-Q) was used to explore the impact of military noise exposure on hearing loss, tinnitus, and subjective hearing difficulties in 287 Service members and 403 Veterans enrolled in the NOISE Study. Participants completed the LENS-Q, Hearing Handicap Inventory for Adults, Tinnitus Screener, and pure-tone audiometry. Low, middle and high noise exposure groups were defined based on LENS-Q scores. Multivariable logistic regression analyses with noise exposure as the risk factor were completed with low-, high-, and extended high-frequency hearing loss (HL), presence of tinnitus, and subjective hearing difficulties as outcome variables. Regression models adjusted for age and sex show that compared to low noise exposure groups, high exposure groups had twice the odds of tinnitus, three times the odds of subjective hearing difficulties, and 2-3 times the odds of HL in low, high, and extended-high frequencies. These findings underscore the importance of hearing conservation programs in the military and have implications for disability planning in the future. Data reallocated from : Griest SE, Bramhall NF, Reavis KM, Theodoroff SM, Henry JA. Development of the Lifetime Exposure to Noise and Solvents Questionnaire (LENS-Q): Preliminary results from the NOISE Study, Am J Audiol, in press

Speakers
avatar for James Schultz, AuD

James Schultz, AuD

Research Audiologist, The Geneva Foundation
James Schultz, AuD, CCC-A received his BA in architectural acoustics from Columbia College Chicago in 2009 and earned his doctorate degree from Arizona State University in 2017. He has been a research audiologist with The Geneva Foundation since early 2020 where he works in support... Read More →


Friday February 11, 2022 12:45pm - 1:15pm CST
Virtual

1:15pm CST

Safe in Sound Award and Closing Remarks
Friday February 11, 2022 1:15pm - 1:45pm CST
Virtual

2:00pm CST

Networking Opportunity with Sponsors
Friday February 11, 2022 2:00pm - 3:00pm CST
Virtual
 
Saturday, February 12
 

9:30am CST

Welcome Remarks and Award Ceremony
Saturday February 12, 2022 9:30am - 10:30am CST
Virtual

10:30am CST

Peeling the Speech Banana
The speech banana is ubiquitous in the classroom and the clinic, but what nutritional value does it hold for understanding the effect of hearing loss on speech perception? The speech banana is used to illustrate the frequency of the speech sounds (phonemes) and how hearing loss may therefore result in difficulty in perception of certain sounds. However, in reality each phoneme encompasses a frequency range, not a single frequency, and therefore attempting to map hearing loss to individual phoneme perception is not as straightforward as we might think. The typical speech banana graphic provides an overly simplistic representation of the speech frequencies. Further, not all speech bananas are the same. A close examination of various speech bananas shows that some have greater nutritional value than others. This presentation will provide an overview of phoneme acoustic characteristics as well as a historical overview of the ubiquitous speech banana so that we can better understand (and interpret) the nutritional value that it holds.

Speakers
avatar for Donald Finan, Ph.D.

Donald Finan, Ph.D.

Professor, University of Northern Colorado
Donald Finan, Ph.D., is a Professor of Audiology and Speech-Language Sciences at the University of Northern Colorado. He received a BS in speech-language pathology and audiology from Eastern Illinois University and a MS in speech-language pathology from the same institution. He received... Read More →


Saturday February 12, 2022 10:30am - 11:00am CST
Virtual

11:00am CST

Break
Saturday February 12, 2022 11:00am - 11:15am CST
TBA

11:15am CST

NHCA Business Meeting
Saturday February 12, 2022 11:15am - 11:45am CST
Virtual

11:45am CST

The life and influence of everyone’s favorite cochlear evangelist, Don Gasaway
Many hearing conservationists have been educated and inspired by the late Donald C. Gasaway who passed away in April 2021. We, as a profession, would be much poorer were it not for Don Gasaway. Don is probably best remembered for his ability to enthrall an audience with his prose; no props needed. However, he was also a leader in hearing conservation research and was the Chief of the Audiology and Hearing Conservation Function for the Air Force where he was employed for 24 years. His influence extended beyond the military. Don was one of those hearing conservationists who strongly shaped and led NHCA. In fact, NHCA’s only named lecture, is the Gasaway Lecture. In this talk we will recall Don’s contributions, share some stories, illustrate his impact, and play videos of talks from his early career in the Military and his work with the first author teaching E-A-R Clinics for Aearo Technologies (now 3M).

Speakers
avatar for Elliott Berger, M.S.

Elliott Berger, M.S.

President, Berger Acoustical Consulting, LLC
Elliott is the President of Berger Acoustical Consulting, LLC. Previously, as a Division Scientist for 3M, he studied hearing protection, hearing conservation, and related topics, for over 40 years, and authored 17 textbook chapters and over 75 published articles. He chairs the ANSI... Read More →
avatar for Theresa Schulz, Ph.D

Theresa Schulz, Ph.D

Dr Theresa Schulz is the President of the National Hearing Conservation Association. With graduate degrees from the University of Texas and the Ohio State University, as well as almost 30 years of experience, Dr Schulz provides consultation in hearing loss prevention issues and hearing... Read More →


Saturday February 12, 2022 11:45am - 12:15pm CST
Virtual

12:15pm CST

Gasaway Lecture
Saturday February 12, 2022 12:15pm - 12:45pm CST
Virtual

12:45pm CST

1:45pm CST

An Exploration of Hearing Health Behaviors in University Music Faculty, Staff, and Students
Hearing loss and damage to the auditory system as a result of loud sound exposure is well documented. Musicians are particularly at risk for hearing loss and damage to the auditory system and are a unique population in which the detriments of this damage affect not only their quality of life, but also their careers. University faculty, staff, and student musicians are uniquely situated to be educated on the risks of music-induced hearing loss (MIHL) as well as preventative measures for healthy hearing behaviors. In this study, the hearing health behaviors of university student, faculty, and staff musicians will be surveyed. Survey topics include awareness of MIHL in musicians, use of hearing protection devices, symptoms of hearing loss, loud sound level exposure history, as well as education on the effects of loud sound levels and hearing health. Analysis of survey results will reveal whether this population will require hearing conservation education as well as potentially determine if the hearing health behaviors of faculty and staff influence the behaviors of students.

Speakers
KF

Katarina Falero

Student, Purdue University
Katarina Falero is a 3rd year Doctor of Audiology student at Purdue University and is interested in preserving the hearing of generations to come. She has worked alongside her campus chapter of the Student Academy of Audiology as President and a member to provide hearing sensitivity... Read More →
AS

Anne Sommer, AuD

Anne Sommer, Au.D., CCC-A, CPS/A is a Clinical Assistant Professor at Purdue University. Dr. Sommer began her career in a hospital setting providing diagnostic audiology services and supervising industrial audiology programs in the community. After working in a multi-specialty physician’s... Read More →


Saturday February 12, 2022 1:45pm - 2:45pm CST
Virtual

1:45pm CST

An Exploratory Study on Problem and Life Effects in Individuals with Noise-Induced Hearing loss: An ICF based study
Hearing loss caused by exposure to very intense sounds or unacceptable levels of sound for long periods is called Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL). Noise exposure can result in both auditory and non-auditory effects. The conventional audiological test battery assesses only the auditory effects. To evaluate the overall impact of NIHL, it is vital for the Audiologists to profile the non-auditory effects. Using ICF core sets for NIHL can establish perceptual correlates (auditory and non-auditory effects). The current study aims to profile the perceptual correlates of noise exposure and correlate them with conventional clinical measures. The study sample included 34 adults with NIHL, and the data were collected using two open-ended questions. A Wilcoxon signed-rank test and Spearson rank correlation were performed. There were no significant differences in the number of responses between the two questions. None of these responses correlated with the demographic and audiological findings; this signifies the need to understand the other confounding factors associated with NIHL. Based on these findings, future audiological assessment protocols for noise-induced hearing loss can address these problem areas along with the audiological test battery for a better outcome.

Speakers
avatar for Muthu Karthick

Muthu Karthick

Student, All India Institute of Speech and Hearing


Saturday February 12, 2022 1:45pm - 2:45pm CST
Virtual

1:45pm CST

Continuum-based Training for the Appropriate Selection of Hearing Protection Devices
The Department of Defense Hearing Center of Excellence (HCE) Hearing Protection Device Evaluated Products List (HPD EPL) was designed to allow knowledgeable users to select HPDs based upon the noise environment, hearing critical tasks (HCTs) being performed, and measures of how HPDs affect HCTs. The concept for this approach began with actual assessments of HPDs based on ANSI standards, however, assessment data beyond the noise reduction data is often not available. A new approach was developed to use general categories of HPDs in place of the more specific assessment data. An HPD EPL pilot project was designed to train DOD industrial hygienists (civilian and military), safety professionals, and occupational hearing conservation managers to identify work process HCTs and to select HPDs based upon specific noise environments and HCTs. Training products for the pilot project will be presented.

Speakers
avatar for Kari Buchanan, M.P.H., M.A.

Kari Buchanan, M.P.H., M.A.

Industrial Hygienist, zCore Business Solns/DOD Hearing Ctr of Excellence
Kari Buchanan, M.P.H., M.A. is a retired U.S. Navy Industrial Hygiene Officer providing contract support through zCore Business Solutions to the DoD Hearing Center of Excellence. Ms. Buchanan is currently managing efforts on developing a hearing protective device evaluated products... Read More →
KG

Kathy Gates, AuD

Department of Defense (DOD) Hearing Center of Excellence (HCE)
Dr. Kathy Gates joined the Defense Hearing Center of Excellence (HCE) in October 2012 and is currently working under the Prevention Branch. One of her primary roles is to work on launching the Comprehensive Hearing Health Program to Audiology and Hearing Conservation/Program Clinics... Read More →
RW

Robert Williams, M.S. Eng

Mr. Williams is an engineer for the Department of Defense Hearing Center of Excellence, currently assigned to the US Army Public Health Center. He earned a Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Alabama in 2006, and a Master of Engineering in Acoustics... Read More →


Saturday February 12, 2022 1:45pm - 2:45pm CST
Virtual

1:45pm CST

Design considerations for a dual hearing aid and hearing protection device for individuals with hearing loss
Hearing loss, one of the most common occupational disease worldwide, is still prevalent among workers. Both noise-induced and age-related hearing impairment affects sound detection and localization, as well as speech communication, compromising safety and efficiency at the workplace. While hearing aids are commonly used, current products are not yet designed for noisy workplace environments and could even be responsible for further hearing loss by amplifying sounds already at mid levels. This project aims at developing a unique protective hearing aid to enhance communication and monitor an individual’s noise exposure in loud environments. Hearing aid algorithms will be implemented into a binaural device, with two earplugs each instrumented with a loudspeaker and two microphones, such that a final prototype has the benefits of both hearing aids and hearing protectors. Intra-aural dosimetry will be added for continuous monitoring of the individual’s noise dose. Following electroacoustic and psychoacoustic validation with human participants, the final prototype should result in an open platform for research and could lead to a commercialized device. Results from this work could lead to new guidelines for audiologists and hearing aid/protector manufacturers.

Speakers
CG

Christian Giguere, PhD

Professor, University of Ottawa
SO

Solenn Ollivier

PhD student, École de Technologie Supérieure
Solenn holds an engineering degree from École Nationale Supérieure d’Arts et Métiers (ENSAM, France) and a Master of Science in Biomedical Engineering from Columbia University (NY, USA). Deeply passionate about sciences and their ability to help others she has always been looking... Read More →
JV

Jérémie Voix, P.Eng., PhD

Professor, Université du Québec
Physicist by training and acoustician by passion, Professor Jérémie Voix has received several awards and honors.He has been recently awarded the Early Career Award from the International Commission on Acoustics for his « outstanding contributions to ear acoustics, particularly... Read More →


Saturday February 12, 2022 1:45pm - 2:45pm CST
Virtual

1:45pm CST

Protocol for a systematic review of the effects of hearing protection field attenuation estimation systems and associated training on the level of noise attenuation in workers exposed to noise
This poster presents the protocol for a systematic review of the effects of hearing protection field attenuation estimation systems and associated training on the level of noise attenuation in workers exposed to noise. We aim to review studies on interventions consisting of fit testing of personal hearing protection devices (HPDs), by the various existing methods (Real-ear attenuation at threshold - REAT; microphone-in-real-ear - MIRE, and loudness balance) and instructions/training associated with the use of HPDs. The electronic search will include academic databases for potentially relevant records from published and unpublished studies, including Medline; PsycINFO; the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) Library; Embase; CINAHL; Scopus; and NIOSHTIC-2, with no language or time restriction. Two review authors will independently screen titles and abstracts/full text of potentially eligible records, followed by extraction of data, assessment of the risk of bias and the quality of evidence, using the most suited tools currently available. The outcomes that will be compared are the change in personal attenuation rating (PAR) or in pass rate of PAR achieving the target attenuation.

Speakers
avatar for Thais Morata, Ph.D.

Thais Morata, Ph.D.

Senior Research Audiologist, NIOSH/CDC
Thais Morata is a Research Audiologist at the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health in the US and the Director of the Safe-in-Sound Excellence in Hearing Loss Prevention Award™. Thais is a Founding Associate Editor for the International Journal of Audiology and for... Read More →


Saturday February 12, 2022 1:45pm - 2:45pm CST
Virtual

1:45pm CST

Student Musicians and Hearing Protection: a Multimodal Experiment
Collegiate musicians are often an overlooked population for hearing protection and preservation. They may not fit the occupational hearing risks, consider music as noise, or match interests with adult musicians. Student musicians are heavily influenced by peers and social learning, thus specific measures must be taken to provide hearing conservation that is more inclusive to this population. Short multimodal videos complete with simulations of hearing loss and student musicians’ personal stories of hearing protection and/or hearing loss may be an effective way to influence student musicians’ knowledge, attitudes, and short-term behaviors towards hearing protection and readiness for change. This project is ongoing with testing outcomes in progress.

Speakers
avatar for Erika Cowhey, MA

Erika Cowhey, MA

Student, University of Iowa
Erika Cowhey is a master’s student at the University of Iowa studying Music Therapy. She holds bachelor’s degrees in Music Theory and Psychology, with a minor in Honors Humanities from Azusa Pacific University. Erika works with Dr. Kate Gfeller in the Music Perception Lab at the... Read More →
KC

Kathryn Crawford, Ph.D

Kate Crawford currently works as a Postdoctoral Research Scholar for the Department of Occupational and Environmental Health (OEH) at the University of Iowa. Kate received her MS in Industrial Hygiene in 2016 and her PhD in Occupational and Environmental Health in 2020 as a trainee... Read More →
AD

Abbey Dvorak, Ph.D, MT-BC

Abbey Dvorak, PhD, MT-BC, is assistant professor of music therapy at The University of Iowa where she is head of the music therapy area and director of graduate studies. She received her PhD and MA from The University of Iowa. Dr. Dvorak’s research interests focus on music therapy... Read More →
SF

Stephanie Fleckenstein, AuD, CCC-A

Stephanie M. Fleckenstein received her B.S. in Speech and Hearing Sciences and M.A. in Audiology from the University of Iowa. She later received her Au.D. from AT Still University. Stephanie is a Clinical Associate Professor in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders... Read More →
KG

Kate Gfeller, Ph.D, MT-BC

For over 30 years, Kate Gfeller, Ph.D., has directed research on music perception within the Iowa Cochlear Implant Clinical Research Team in the Department of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics. Her research has been funded by the National... Read More →
DK

Danielle Kelsay, MA, CCC-A

Danielle Kelsay received her B.S. in Biology and her M.A. in Audiology from The University of Iowa. Currently, Danielle is the Director of Clinical Programs in Audiology and a Clinical Associate Professor in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at the University... Read More →


Saturday February 12, 2022 1:45pm - 2:45pm CST
Virtual

1:45pm CST

University Marching Band Members Noise Dosages & Hearing Health Related Knowledge
Objectives: [1]To measure sound exposure levels of marching band and non-marching band members during a football game, [2] to compare these exposure levels to sound level dose limits set by National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), and [3] to evaluate the perceptions of marching band members about their hearing health risk from loud sound exposure and their use of hearing protection devices (HPDs). Design: Noise dosimetry measurements were completed on the band director and six marching band members during rehearsals and performances. Dosimetry measurements for two audience members were collected during the performances. Noise dose values were obtained using NIOSH criteria. 123 marching band members responded to a questionnaire analyzing perceptions of loud music exposure, preventive behavior, and the associated hearing health and noise-related risks. Results: Noise dose values surpassed the NIOSH recommended limits among all six marching band members during rehearsals and performances. The sound levels recorded during performances were higher than the rehearsals. Most marching band members reported low concern for hearing health-related risks from high sound exposures and minimal use of HPDs. Conclusion: High sound exposure and low concern regarding auditory risk among band members highlight the need for comprehensive hearing conservation programs for this population.

Speakers
avatar for Ishan Sunilkumar Bhatt, Ph.D., CCC-A, F-AAA

Ishan Sunilkumar Bhatt, Ph.D., CCC-A, F-AAA

Associate Professor, University of Iowa
Dr. Ishan Bhatt is the Director of the Audiogenomics Research Laboratory in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at the University of Iowa. He received his Ph.D. from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro and MASPL – Masters of Audiology, Speech and Language... Read More →
RM

Rebecca Meier, AuD

Rebecca Meier is the Director of Clinical Education at Ohio University. Her areas of research are vestibular assessment and rehabilitation and Noise-Induced Hearing Loss (NIHL).
NN

Nicole Nadeau, AuD (4th year graduate student)

Nicole Nadeau is a fourth-year graduate student pursuing her Clinical Doctorate of Audiology at Ohio University. Her current Clinical Externship is at a Private Practice located in Concord & Manchester, New Hampshire. She has worked in Dr. Nilesh Washnik's Noise & Hearing Research... Read More →
JR

Jeffrey Russell, Ph.D

Jeff Russell is Associate Professor of Athletic Training and Director of Science and Health in Artistic Performance at Ohio University. He leads a team of athletic trainers and researchers who care for injured performing artists and conduct research on concussions, musculoskeletal... Read More →
avatar for Nilesh Washnik, Ph.D

Nilesh Washnik, Ph.D

Assistant Professor, Ohio University
Nilesh Washnik currently works as an Assistant Professor at the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Ohio University, Athens. Nilesh received his PhD in Audiology from the University of North Carolina, Greensboro. His areas of research are Noise-Induced Hearing Loss... Read More →


Saturday February 12, 2022 1:45pm - 2:45pm CST
Virtual

1:45pm CST

Urinary Volatile Organic Compound Metabolites as Potential Biomarkers for Tinnitus
Tinnitus, a phantom perception of ringing, buzzing, or other noise in the ears or head in the absence of an external sound source, is a common condition that affects about 10% of US adults (Bhatt et al. 2016). Oxidative stress is a major contributor to tinnitus. Exogenic risk factors for tinnitus, such as noise exposure and smoking, are known to cause oxidative stress. The direct evaluation of oxidative stress in the auditory system is not feasible in humans. However, the systemic oxidative stress, as assessed by urinary volatile organic compounds (VOC), might be used as a proxy measure for oxidative stress in the auditory system. We utilized the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) database to investigate the relationship between urinary VOC metabolites and tinnitus. Our analysis identified four VOC metabolites (creatinine, N-acetyl-S-(2-cyanoethyl)-L-cysteine, N-acetyl-S-(3-Hydroxypropyl)-L-cysteine, and 2-methylhippuric acid) associated with tinnitus. Our results suggest that urinary VOC metabolites might be used as potential biomarkers for tinnitus.

Speakers
avatar for Ishan Sunilkumar Bhatt, Ph.D., CCC-A, F-AAA

Ishan Sunilkumar Bhatt, Ph.D., CCC-A, F-AAA

Associate Professor, University of Iowa
Dr. Ishan Bhatt is the Director of the Audiogenomics Research Laboratory in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at the University of Iowa. He received his Ph.D. from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro and MASPL – Masters of Audiology, Speech and Language... Read More →
avatar for Sarah Kingsbury, BA, BS

Sarah Kingsbury, BA, BS

AuD Graduate Student, University of Iowa
Sarah Kingsbury is a Doctorate of Audiology (Au.D.) student at the University of Iowa and a Research Assistant in Dr. Ishan Bhatt's Audiogenomics Lab. Her clinical interests include cochlear implant programming and counseling, electrophysiological testing, and tinnitus management... Read More →
avatar for Nilesh Washnik, Ph.D

Nilesh Washnik, Ph.D

Assistant Professor, Ohio University
Nilesh Washnik currently works as an Assistant Professor at the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Ohio University, Athens. Nilesh received his PhD in Audiology from the University of North Carolina, Greensboro. His areas of research are Noise-Induced Hearing Loss... Read More →


Saturday February 12, 2022 1:45pm - 2:45pm CST
Virtual

1:45pm CST

Workers’ Compensation Costs for Occupational Hearing Loss Claims in the United States, 2009-2013
Background: This study estimated the average annual number of U.S. workers' compensation (WC) claims for occupational hearing loss (OHL) and their associated cost and identified the industry/occupation classifications with the highest numbers of OHL claims. The most recent U.S. cost estimate ($242 million) was based on data from one state in 1991. Methods: WC data from the National Council on Compensation Insurance, Inc. and two individual states were examined, incorporating 37 states and the District of Columbia. Sensitivity analyses were performed to develop ranges for the point estimates. Results: The estimated U.S. average annual OHL claim cost fell in the range of $48–$63 million during 2009-2013, with a point estimate of $57 million (2013 dollars). Industry/occupation classifications with the highest numbers of claims included Aviation – All Other Employees and Drivers (837), Coal Mining (605), and Clerical Office Employees (353). Conclusions: WC data underestimate the burden of OHL. WC laws, industry composition and other factors vary widely by state. Therefore, this study's estimates employed data for many states to better reflect the diversity of the U.S. Workers in a wide range of industry/occupation classifications need special attention to prevent OHL.

Speakers
avatar for Elizabeth Masterson, PhD, CPH, COHC

Elizabeth Masterson, PhD, CPH, COHC

Research Epidemiologist, NIOSH
Elizabeth (Liz) Masterson is a Research Epidemiologist in the Health Informatics Branch of the Division of Field Studies and Engineering at the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), Cincinnati, Ohio. She is the Project Officer for the NIOSH Occupational Hearing... Read More →


Saturday February 12, 2022 1:45pm - 2:45pm CST
Virtual

3:00pm CST

Accuracy of audiometric indicators of hearing trouble
There is a long history of using audiometric criteria to identify people likely to experience hearing trouble in daily life. Some audiometric criteria favor sensitivity (i.e., maximizing correct identification of people reporting hearing trouble), while others favor specificity (i.e., minimizing misidentification of people without reported hearing trouble as hearing impaired). Positive predictive value (PPV, i.e., likelihood of criterion accurately predicting hearing trouble) depends on high specificity. The difference between the population prevalence of hearing trouble (16% in those aged 20-49 years) and the PPV is an indication of a criterion’s usefulness. In this presentation, we report sensitivity, specificity, and predictive values for various audiometric criteria, ranging from highly sensitive (e.g., any audiometric threshold worse than 15 dB HL) to highly specific (e.g., pure tone average thresholds worse than 40 dB), using data generalizing to the U.S. population (National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey - NHANES). The most sensitive criteria yield PPVs approximating the population prevalence of self-reported hearing trouble, meaning that positive decisions based on those criteria are as accurate as using no criteria. The preponderance of people identified using these criteria do not report hearing trouble, so these criteria cannot be used to predict hearing trouble with reasonable confidence.

Speakers
avatar for Gregory Flamme, Ph.D.

Gregory Flamme, Ph.D.

Senior Scientist, SASRAC
Dr. Gregory Flamme is the Senior Scientist and Chief Operating Officer of Stephenson and Stephenson Research and Consulting (SASRAC), which is a company founded by Dr. Mark Stephenson and Dr. Carol Stephenson. Dr. Flamme has a Ph.D. in Audiology from the University of Memphis, completed... Read More →
CS

Carol Stephenson, Ph.D.

Dr. Carol Stephenson is the Chief Executive Officer of Stephenson and Stephenson Research and Consulting (SASRAC). She is a Social psychologist with her doctoral work in applied social and experimental psychology. Dr. Stephenson worked for The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention... Read More →
MS

Mark Stephenson, Ph.D.

Dr. Mark Stephenson is the owner and principal consultant for Stephenson and Stephenson Research and Consulting (SASRAC). He received his Ph.D. in audiology and hearing science from The Ohio State University in 1986. Mark was a Lt. Colonel in the U.S. Air Force, where he served until... Read More →
ST

Stephen Tasko, Ph.D.

Dr. Stephen Tasko is an Associate Professor Emeritus in the Department of Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences at Western Michigan University and Research Consultant with Stephenson and Stephenson Research and Consulting (SASRAC). Dr. Tasko earned his Ph.D. in Communication Disorders... Read More →
avatar for Christa Themann, MA, CCC-A

Christa Themann, MA, CCC-A

Audiologist, NIOSH
Christi is a Research Audiologist at the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health in Cincinnati, Ohio. She received her master’s degree in audiology from the University of Cincinnati and is a doctoral candidate in epidemiology. Her research experience includes animal... Read More →


Saturday February 12, 2022 3:00pm - 8:00pm CST
Virtual

3:00pm CST

Adult Hearing Wellness Screenings-Expanding the Scope of Audiologic Care at Mayo Clinic
Growing demands for audiologic care related to early detection of hearing loss and prevention, require defining new pathways utilizing audiology-extender models (audiology assistants, nurses, technicians) to promote timely accessibility and affordability of care. We aimed to define care pathways for individuals age 50 years or older with suspected normal hearing. Initial clinical 6-month planning data for ages 50-55 years demonstrated ~65% (233/359) with a diagnosis of normal hearing. For the clinical practice pilot, two pathways were defined including direct to audiology referral (audiologist; higher risk) versus preventative medicine hearing wellness screening (nursing; lower risk). Over the 4-month evaluation period, 200 patients (ages 18-59 years) scheduled for Audiology were identified. Participants meeting the pre-defined clinical triage criteria (n=32; ~16%) were offered a hearing wellness screening via automated audiometry prior to their scheduled Audiology visit. Enhancements in clinical triage, clinical practice protocols/workflows, auditory risk assessment, patient education, and outcomes reporting were accomplished. Outcomes indicated feasibility and capacity of audiology-extender models (combined with hearing metrics) to improve accessibility to meet the hearing needs of the patient.

Speakers
AG

Adam Goulson, Au.D.

Adam Goulson, Au.D. is a clinical audiologist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN. He received his Au.D. from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln in Lincoln, Nebraska. He is currently the Lead of the vestibular program within the Division of Audiology. His interest is in the evaluation... Read More →
avatar for Gayla Poling, Ph.D.

Gayla Poling, Ph.D.

Director, Diagnostic Audiology Research, Mayo Clinic
Gayla L. Poling, Ph.D. is the Director of Diagnostic Audiology Research at Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN. She studied Audiology and Hearing Sciences at The Ohio State University and completed postdoctoral fellowships at the Medical University of South Carolina and Northwestern University... Read More →


Saturday February 12, 2022 3:00pm - 8:00pm CST
Virtual

3:00pm CST

Association of Noise from Various Sources with Risk of Hearing Trouble and Tinnitus: The 2014 National Health Interview Survey
The US National Health Interview Survey collects self-reported data on health behaviors and outcomes. A special supplement in 2014 collected information on hearing difficulty, bothersome tinnitus, and history of noise exposure from firearms and loud and very loud noise at and away from work. Odds ratios were calculated to estimate risk using multivariable logistic regression to control for age, race/ethnicity, socio-economic status, smoking, and relevant chronic conditions. As expected, both hearing trouble and tinnitus increased with increasing levels, durations, and sources of exposure. Among males reporting only a single source of noise, risk of hearing trouble and tinnitus were greatest among those exposed to very loud occupational noise for at least five years. Exposure to non-work noise alone doubled the risk of hearing trouble and nearly doubled the risk of tinnitus. Most individuals reported exposures from more than one source. Combined exposure to very loud work noise for 5+ years, non-work noise, and firearms increased risk of hearing trouble more than eightfold and tinnitus more than ninefold. Interventions to reduce exposure from all noise sources are needed.

Speakers
avatar for Christa Themann, MA, CCC-A

Christa Themann, MA, CCC-A

Audiologist, NIOSH
Christi is a Research Audiologist at the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health in Cincinnati, Ohio. She received her master’s degree in audiology from the University of Cincinnati and is a doctoral candidate in epidemiology. Her research experience includes animal... Read More →


Saturday February 12, 2022 3:00pm - 8:00pm CST
Virtual

3:00pm CST

Auditory function and Health Related Quality of Life in Forestry Workers
Logging machines in the U.S.A. has been shown to operate at noise levels that exceed the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) standard’s time weighted average (TWA) of 90 dBA for full shift exposure. Logging firms in the southeastern United States almost exclusively operate highly mechanized, full tree harvesting systems with less than 10 employees in each facility. Operations typically involve the use of feller bunchers to fell trees, grapple skidders to get the felled trees from the spot of felling to a landing, and loaders to delimb and cut the trees to length. The loader operator is also responsible for loading the trees onto log trucks that then transport the logs to a wood processing facility. We conducted a logging operations funded study on occupational health effects. Our project specifically conducted field studies in logging workers by: a) assessment of levels of occupational noise and Whole Body Vibration (WBV) in forestry logging operations, b) assessing the auditory function of forestry workers, and c) investigating the effects on Health Related Quality of Life (HR-QOL). We found less hazardous noise to be and WBV exposures to be associated with: a) poorer hearing sensitivity and Otoacoustic Emissions and b) poorer HR-QOL reports.

Speakers
avatar for Sridhar Krishnamurti, Ph.D

Sridhar Krishnamurti, Ph.D

Professor of Audiology, Auburn University
Dr. Sridhar Krishnamurti is Professor and Program Director of Audiology at Auburn University. He currently serves on the research grants review panel for several agencies and journals including Ear and Hearing, American Journal of Public Health, JAAA, and Audiology online. Sridhar... Read More →


Saturday February 12, 2022 3:00pm - 8:00pm CST
Virtual

3:00pm CST

Augmenting HCP compliance using real-time in-ear noise monitors
Despite decades of regulatory mandates and guidelines for hearing loss prevention many are still at risk of ONIHL. Organizations such as NHCA, ACGIH, NIOSH, etc. have promulgated new sampling methods and best practices like fit testing and hearing loss simulators to enhance an effective HCP. Hearing Conservationists continually seek better strategies for empowering workers to self-regulate exposure and correct HPD use. However, these often take the form of training and awareness campaigns which are intermittent and difficult to reinforce. Presenting exposure data from infrequent exposure assessments may seem abstract or less credible to workers who know their work routine varies greatly and with it, their exposure levels. Therefore, development of a real-time monitor sufficiently low in cost for daily use by an exposed population, yet capable of capturing repeatable, credible exposure level data has potential for preventing permanent HTL shifts when coupled with a near real-time behavioral feedback mechanism. This session will explore system architecture, capabilities and deployment strategies of a system enabling HCP managers to use interactive behavioral feedback techniques for empowering employees to take active ownership of their hearing health while increasing confidence that they are adequately protected.

Speakers
avatar for Rob Brauch, COHC

Rob Brauch, COHC

President, Occupational Health and Safety Solutions
Rob Brauch has been involved in the development of advanced noise monitoring instrumentation for Hearing Conservation applications since 1978. He is currently Founder and President of Occupational Health and Safety Solutions, Inc. Rob is currently or has been a member of the Institute... Read More →


Saturday February 12, 2022 3:00pm - 8:00pm CST
Virtual

3:00pm CST

CDC NIHL Workgroup Update
Since 2017 the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Noise-Induced Hearing Loss (NIHL) Workgroup has disseminated data and public health information on the prevention of NIHL at home and in the community. In 2021 these activities included digital public service announcements for Super Bowl LV, the Daytona 500 stockcar race and targeting new audiences with the National College Football Championship and 26 Major League Soccer games. Going digital allowed for tracking impact data for each event. Another activity was a literature review and environmental scan of 60 existing community noise ordinances conducted on local government web pages or via legal code databases. Ordinances were specifically reviewed to identify 22 key aspects of noise ordinances, including five key noise control measures: audibility, time of day, decibel level, zoning, and specified quiet zones to protect communities at risk (e.g., hospitals, schools). CDC also analyzed a representative sample of U.S. adult population from a 2021 national marketing survey that included questions related to restaurant noise. Findings suggest a need to strengthen a public health focus on the adverse health effects of excessive noise exposure at dining venues.

Speakers
avatar for John Eichwald, M.A.

John Eichwald, M.A.

Health Scientist, Audiologist, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
John Eichwald is an audiologist within the Office of Science in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) National Center for Environmental Health, working on non-occupational noise induced hearing loss. John has over 40 years’ experience in the field of Audiology. He... Read More →


Saturday February 12, 2022 3:00pm - 8:00pm CST
Virtual

3:00pm CST

Cigarette smoking as a risk factor for bothersome tinnitus
Multiple studies have demonstrated a link between cigarette smoking and tinnitus. However, a specification of the relationship between smoking and tinnitus has been hampered by varying definitions of tinnitus cases. In the present study, we examine the relationship between cigarette smoking, in pack-year categories, and bothersome tinnitus in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). Relative to those who never smoked, people with normal hearing (re: WHO/Global Burden of Disease criteria) and had a history of 2 to 9 pack-years of smoking were at elevated odds of reporting bothersome tinnitus (OR: 2.3; 95% CI: 1.4 to 3.6). People with less than 2 pack-years of smoking history did not have significantly increased odds, and the elevated odds of bothersome tinnitus persisted above 9 pack-years. These results indicate that smoking history greater than 2 pack-years must be considered a risk factor for bothersome tinnitus.

Speakers
KD

Kristy Deiters, Au.D.

Research Audiologist, Stephenson and Stephenson Research and Consulting (SASRAC)
Dr. Kristy Deiters is a research audiologist and consultant with a doctorate in Audiology (Au.D) from Western Michigan University and a Bachelor of Arts degree in Marketing and Economics from Alma College. Dr. Deiters' research interests range from changes in hearing over time, reliability... Read More →
avatar for Gregory Flamme, Ph.D.

Gregory Flamme, Ph.D.

Senior Scientist, SASRAC
Dr. Gregory Flamme is the Senior Scientist and Chief Operating Officer of Stephenson and Stephenson Research and Consulting (SASRAC), which is a company founded by Dr. Mark Stephenson and Dr. Carol Stephenson. Dr. Flamme has a Ph.D. in Audiology from the University of Memphis, completed... Read More →
MS

Mark Stephenson, Ph.D.

Dr. Mark Stephenson is the owner and principal consultant for Stephenson and Stephenson Research and Consulting (SASRAC). He received his Ph.D. in audiology and hearing science from The Ohio State University in 1986. Mark was a Lt. Colonel in the U.S. Air Force, where he served until... Read More →
ST

Stephen Tasko, Ph.D.

Dr. Stephen Tasko is an Associate Professor Emeritus in the Department of Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences at Western Michigan University and Research Consultant with Stephenson and Stephenson Research and Consulting (SASRAC). Dr. Tasko earned his Ph.D. in Communication Disorders... Read More →
avatar for Christa Themann, MA, CCC-A

Christa Themann, MA, CCC-A

Audiologist, NIOSH
Christi is a Research Audiologist at the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health in Cincinnati, Ohio. She received her master’s degree in audiology from the University of Cincinnati and is a doctoral candidate in epidemiology. Her research experience includes animal... Read More →


Saturday February 12, 2022 3:00pm - 8:00pm CST
Virtual

3:00pm CST

Comparisons of auditory risk metrics with suppressed and unsuppressed civilian firearms
The assessment of the risk posed by firearm noise is complicated by the divergence in the allowable numbers of rounds (ANORs) returned by the available damage-risk criteria (DRCs) for impulsive noises. The ANORs returned by DRCs are strongly intercorrelated, but wide differences exist in absolute ANORs. Some firearms have suppressors and/or discharge low-velocity ammunition, both of which increase the ANORs. The extent to which suppressors and low-velocity ammunition alter the relationships among ANORs has not been determined. In this presentation, we present ANORs across many DRCs for 14 civilian firearms (3 handguns, 10 rifles, 1 shotgun) as a function of suppressor and ammunition. Results will be compared against DRC intercorrelations observed across 54 unsuppressed firearm conditions.

Speakers
avatar for William Murphy, Ph.D.

William Murphy, Ph.D.

Coordinator, Hearing Loss Prevention, CDC NIOSH
CAPT William J. Murphy is the coordinator for the Hearing Loss Prevention cross sector for National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. He works in the Division of Field Studies and Engineering, Engineering and Physical Hazards Branch, and the Noise and Bioacoustics Team... Read More →


Saturday February 12, 2022 3:00pm - 8:00pm CST
Virtual

3:00pm CST

Comprehensive characterization of M777 Howitzer noise exposure: clarifying the dose in the dose-response relationship.
Substantial hearing losses have been observed among Service Members firing M777 Howitzer cannons, especially after deployments with repetitive fire missions. The study to be presented, referred to as Characterization of Acute Short-term Military Population Auditory Shifts (CHASMPAS), has extensively measured both noise exposures and hearing performance during numerous live-fire exercises with the M777. Here we will present detailed data on the M777 acoustic environment, including the results of advanced noise-dosimetry technology and blast over-pressure measurements, coupled with documentation of the type and quantity of munitions fired during each exercise and descriptions of the administrative and engineering controls in use. Results of auditory function tests will also be presented, along with longitudinal data from medical records. We will close with a discussion of how these data may be used to improve estimates of noise hazards in operational settings, identify opportunities for additional prevention efforts, and unravel the dose-response relationship between noise and hearing loss.

Speakers
CS

Christopher Smalt, Ph.D

Technical Staff, MIT Lincoln Laboratory
Dr. Smalt is a technical staff member in the Human Health & Performance Systems Group at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Lincoln Laboratory. His current work focuses on computational modeling of hearing damage mechanisms and the effect of noise exposure on hearing and cognitive... Read More →
avatar for Julieta Scalo, PhD, PharmD

Julieta Scalo, PhD, PharmD

DoD Hearing Center of Excellence
Dr. Scalo leads the statistical analysis team of the Department of Defense Hearing Center of Excellence (HCE) and is the Principle Investigator for the Defense Epidemiology and Economic Burden of Hearing Loss Study (DEEBoHLS). Since joining the HCE in 2017, her work has included market... Read More →
avatar for Quintin Hecht, AuD

Quintin Hecht, AuD

Research Audiologist, DoD Hearing Center of Excellence
Quintin Hecht, AuD, is a research audiologist and project manager for the Department of Defense (DoD) Hearing Center of Excellence (HCE) at Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland, Texas. Dr. Hecht joined the DoD HCE in 2016 and also serves as an Army Reserve Audiologist for the Army Public... Read More →


Saturday February 12, 2022 3:00pm - 8:00pm CST
Virtual

3:00pm CST

Developing a fast and easy system for hearing- and earplug fit-testing
Our team is developing a new field attenuation estimation system (FAES) for earplugs through a Small Business Innovation and Research award funded by the National Institutes of Occupational Safety and Health. This new system will enable hearing conservation programs to easily test both hearing and earplug attenuation for employees who use any brand or style of earplug. The FAES uses automated hearing and fit tests designed to assess multiple workers at once. A novel automated threshold search algorithm increases the speed of the fit test. Like the modified Hughson-Westlake algorithm, this automated test uses dynamic step sizes but incorporates a new method of estimating threshold based on the subject’s responses. By providing an efficient and easy-to-use FAES for hearing conservation programs, this system could have a significant impact on preserving employee hearing. In this presentation, we will describe progress to date in the development and testing of this new FAES.

Speakers
OC

Odile Clavier, Ph.D.

Dr. Odile Clavier received her bachelor’s degree from Florida Tech and her master’s and Ph.D. from Stanford University in the department of Aeronautics and Astronautics. Since joining Creare, she has been the Principal Investigator for several biomedical applications. She has... Read More →
DH

David Hinckley, Ph.D.

Forthcoming - this is my fault - I told them that they did not need to submit a bio, just the lead presenter - JBT
AS

Amelia Servi, Ph.D.

Forthcoming - this is my fault - I told them that they did not need submit a bio, just the lead presenter - JBT
avatar for Jennifer Tufts, Ph.D.

Jennifer Tufts, Ph.D.

Professor, University of Connecticut
Jennifer Tufts, Ph.D. is a professor of audiology in the Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences at the University of Connecticut. Previously, she completed postdoctoral clinical and research training at Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Washington DC. She is a past-president... Read More →


Saturday February 12, 2022 3:00pm - 8:00pm CST
Virtual

3:00pm CST

Evaluating earplug performance over a workshift with a fit-test system
The attenuation of hearing protection devices (HPD) can change when workers are physically active or when the temporomandibular joint moves. Some earplugs may be more prone to stability issues over a workshift. This study measured changes in personal attenuation ratings of three foam and three premolded earplugs over the course of a 2-hour workshift for thirty factory workers: twenty workers were tested in year 1; nineteen in year 2; and twenty-one in year 3. Not all workers participated in the three years. The personal attenuation ratings (PARs) were measured at the beginning and end of a 2-hour work shift. Workers were initially fit tested to confirm they obtained a PAR of at least 15 dB. Workers were instructed not to touch or adjust their earplugs in any way. To ensure both that workers did not touch their earplugs as well as to ensure workers were protected from noise exposures if their earplugs slipped, workers wore an electronic earmuff. Open-ear and occluded-ear thresholds at 500, 1000, and 2000 Hz for third-octave bands of noise were measured with the NIOSH HPD Well-Fit™ system to estimate PARs.

Speakers
avatar for William Murphy, Ph.D.

William Murphy, Ph.D.

Coordinator, Hearing Loss Prevention, CDC NIOSH
CAPT William J. Murphy is the coordinator for the Hearing Loss Prevention cross sector for National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. He works in the Division of Field Studies and Engineering, Engineering and Physical Hazards Branch, and the Noise and Bioacoustics Team... Read More →


Saturday February 12, 2022 3:00pm - 8:00pm CST
Virtual

3:00pm CST

Extended High Frequency Audiometry as a Predictor of Noise Induced Hearing Loss
There is renewed interest the US with preventative healthcare and wellness, focused on education, healthy lifestyles, and protective measures against injury and disease. Unfortunately, Audiology may be behind the curve when addressing the needs of people exposed to music. Noise-induced hearing loss is completely preventable; therefore, audiology best practice should execute preventative strategies like screening, monitoring, and education. Our analysis indicates that extended high frequency (EHF) thresholds, from 9-18 kHz reveal noise-induced injury to the auditory system before a noticeable threshold change in the conventionally-tested frequencies (.025-8 kHz). Similar research has been conducted with industrial workers, while this data set focuses on those in the music industry, both amateur and professional. Patient data from Sensaphonics Hearing Wellness was retrospectively analyzed using weighted linear regression, comparing those with bilateral notches (all other thresholds WNL) in the conventional frequencies to those with bilateral normal hearing, grouped by age decade. The data demonstrated that EHF thresholds are a significant predictor of notches with those under age 40. After 40, the notch and normal groups begin to overlap in EHFs, likely due to other age-related factors like cardiovascular health. EHF audiometry should be implemented with patient education as a wellness strategy for hearing healthcare.

Speakers
avatar for Shannon Barry

Shannon Barry

Audiology Doctoral Student, Rush University Medical Center
Shannon Barry is a fourth-year Doctor of Audiology student at Rush University, completing her externship at the Edward Hines VAMC in Chicago, IL. Hearing conservation is her mission. She is passionate about educating and empowering the public to make healthy decisions- and advocating... Read More →


Saturday February 12, 2022 3:00pm - 8:00pm CST
Virtual

3:00pm CST

Field fit testing with E-A-Rfit Dual-Ear in China
This presentation introduces hearing protection fit testing on workers (n=1197) in three different factories in China. The 3MTM E-A-RfitTM Dual-Ear validation system was used to measure the Personal Attenuation Rating (PAR), on eleven different models of Hearing Protection Devices (HPDs). The subjects who did not achieve the minimum required attenuation would receive intervention voluntarily. A survey was used to collect the subjects’ general information, information related HPDs use, and attitudes toward HPDs use. Result shows that PARs varied widely among individuals, and there were significant differences in PARs of workers in the three factories, the reason of which may be due to the hearing conservation management system and the attention characteristics of the HPD used. The males, under the age of thirty, with college education or above and five to fifteen years of service, achieved higher PAR values in the field fit testing than the others. In addition, the main reasons for failure in the test were improper fitting and inappropriate selection of hearing protectors. One-on-one intervention together with fit testing were shown to improve the PARs, which shall be essential to hearing protection.

Speakers
avatar for Shibiao Su, Ph.D

Shibiao Su, Ph.D

chief physician, Guangdong Province Hospital for Occupational Disease Prevention and Treatment
Shibiao Su graduated from the School of Public Health, Shanghai Medical University in July 1997 with a major in preventive medicine. In July 2006, he received his master's degree from Soochow University. He, a chief physician, has worked in Guangdong Occupational Disease Prevention... Read More →


Saturday February 12, 2022 3:00pm - 8:00pm CST
Virtual

3:00pm CST

Genetic risk factors for noise-induced hearing loss and tinnitus
Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) and tinnitus are clinically heterogeneous traits. Noise exposure is a known risk factor. However, substantial phenotypic heterogeneity in these traits remains unexplained after accounting for the effect of noise exposure. This presentation will (1) review the current literature on the genetic basis of NIHL and tinnitus, and (2) will present our case-control genetic association studies on NIHL and tinnitus. Our literature review suggested that genetic variants in several cochlear genes, metabolic enzymes, and structural proteins are associated with NIHL and tinnitus. We found that most genetic studies were conducted on older factory workers exposed to loud traumatic noise and organic solvent. To control for the effect of age-related confounders, we investigated the genetic basis of NIHL and tinnitus in young, healthy musician students. Our sample included 640 music majors aged 18-25 years. We found that a genetic variant in KCNE1 (rs2070358) and CAT (rs12273124) showed a significant association with NIHL. A genetic variant in KCNQ (rs163171) revealed a significant association with tinnitus. Future research is required to build clinically useful polygenic risk models for identifying susceptible individuals well before acquiring permanent NIHL and tinnitus.

Speakers
avatar for Ishan Sunilkumar Bhatt, Ph.D., CCC-A, F-AAA

Ishan Sunilkumar Bhatt, Ph.D., CCC-A, F-AAA

Associate Professor, University of Iowa
Dr. Ishan Bhatt is the Director of the Audiogenomics Research Laboratory in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at the University of Iowa. He received his Ph.D. from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro and MASPL – Masters of Audiology, Speech and Language... Read More →


Saturday February 12, 2022 3:00pm - 8:00pm CST
Virtual

3:00pm CST

Healthy Hearing, Healthy Aging in the Time of Covid
In 2020, the Healthy Hearing, Healthy Aging protocol and first data was presented at the NHCA Annual Conference. The goal of our project was to examine hearing and cognitive abilities in aging independent farmers and ranchers over the age of 50. Recent large-scale public health studies among elderly and middle-aged persons indicated hearing loss presents a significant and independent risk factor for the development of dementia later in life. Hearing loss prior to the age of 65 contributed an 8% risk of dementia. Covid-19 ended our face-to-face data collection. Since that time, we have developed a self-assessment survey of hearing status and the impact of hearing on communication, sleep disruption, safety on the farm, balance, falls, traumatic brain injury, and concomitant health concerns. Our survey can be completed face-to-face or through remote testing. The survey was developed to be both quick and feature key items from the 2020 Lancet report on Dementia Prevention, Intervention and Care, and the NIOSH Worker Well-being Questionnaire. Our revised Covid-19 protocol will be implemented in the fall 2021 at various agricultural fairs in central Nebraska. Our preliminary findings will be reported as well as future modifications needed to comply with the Covid-19 pandemic precautions.

Speakers
avatar for Jan Moore, Ph.D.

Jan Moore, Ph.D.

Professor, University of Nebraska Kearney
Jan Allison Moore received graduate degrees from the University of Illinois (Ph.D.) and Purdue University (M.S.) and her undergraduate degree from the University of Central Arkansas. She also completed a graduate certificate program in Public Health at the University of Nebraska Medical... Read More →


Saturday February 12, 2022 3:00pm - 8:00pm CST
Virtual

3:00pm CST

Hearing Conservation Efforts in a University School of Music Program
Student musicians are at increased risk for excessive sound exposures in comparison to their collegiate peers. Their dedication to their studies through long hours of rehearsal and performances increase their risk of Music Induced Hearing Disorders (MIHDs). The repercussions of MIHDs can negatively impact their physical, emotional, social, and occupational well-being. A partnership between the Michigan Medicine Audiology Department and the University of Michigan School of Music, Theatre, and Dance (SMTD) was developed to establish a prevention focused program for student musicians. This is facilitated through the SMTD’s Wellness Program with a concentration in education and prevention against MIHDs to encourage students to take proactive measures for their hearing health. Screening, outreach, and creative action taken during the COVID pandemic to support hearing conservation in this group will be discussed.

Speakers
BE

Bruce Edwards, AuD

Bruce Edwards, AuD, recently retired from his position as Assistant Director of Adult Audiology at Michigan Medicine Otolaryngology. He continues to be a member of the Michigan’s School of Music, Theatre & Dance's Wellness Initiative. He is involved in a program of hearing conservation... Read More →
avatar for Allie Heckman, AuD

Allie Heckman, AuD

Clinical Audiologist, University of Michigan- Michigan Medicine
Allie Heckman, AuD, is a clinical audiologist at Michigan Medicine Audiology. She specializes in hearing wellness; including hearing conservation, hearing rehabilitation, and tinnitus management for the adult patient population. She is a member of the School of Music, Theatre, and... Read More →
PS

Paola Savvidou, DMA

Paola Savvidou, DMA, NCTM, serves as Wellness Initiative Project Manager and Lecturer in Music at the University of Michigan. She is the author of Teaching the Whole Musician: A Guide to Wellness in the Applied Studio (Oxford University Press) and has twice received Article of the... Read More →


Saturday February 12, 2022 3:00pm - 8:00pm CST
Virtual

3:00pm CST

How does the historically racist policy of redlining impact transportation noise experienced today by neighborhoods in urban centers across Michigan?
Introduction: Maps of >200 US cities were drawn in the 1930s by the Home Owners’ Loan Corporation (HOLC) to classify neighborhoods by mortgage risk. Four categories were used to define the neighborhoods as “best-green”, “still desirable-blue", “definitely declining-yellow", and “hazardous-red”, thus establishing the practice of “redlining”. This practice systematically segregated and denied mortgage loans to minority populations in redlined neighborhoods and continues to shape neighborhoods today; however, no studies have assessed its impact on noise. Methods: US DOT National Transportation Noise Map and 1930s HOLC-maps from 11 cities in Michigan were used to estimate the proportion of hazardous transportation-related noise today (≥70 dBA) for HOLC-neighborhoods. T-tests between redlined and non-redlined neighborhoods and multivariate linear regression were performed to examine whether hazardous transportation-related noise varies by redlining status and is modified by current demographics. Results: Redlining, in Michigan, is a significant predictor of higher hazardous noise proportions and this relationship is modified by current demographics, where communities of higher minority and low-income populations in once-redlined areas experience an even higher proportion of hazardous noise exposure. Discussion: Noise exposure should be considered in environmental justice research, and dismantling structural racism and discrimination is critical to alleviating the excess burden on vulnerable communities.

Speakers
AS

Abas Shkembi, B.S.

Graduate Student Research Assistant, University of Michigan
Abas Shkembi, BS, is a Research Associate and first-year M.S. student in Industrial Hygiene at the University of Michigan School of Public Health Department of Environmental Health Sciences. Abas has a B.S. in Statistics and has gained significant experience integrating multiple large... Read More →
avatar for Lauren Smith, MS, MPH

Lauren Smith, MS, MPH

Research Area Specialist Intermediate, University of Michigan
is a Research Area Specialist at the University of Michigan School of Public Health Department of Environmental Health Sciences. She has an MS in Biomedical Engineering and an MPH with a concentration in Occupational and Environmental Epidemiology. She is a CAOHC certified occupational... Read More →


Saturday February 12, 2022 3:00pm - 8:00pm CST
Virtual

3:00pm CST

Impact of occupational noise on work-related injuries across the US in 2019
Introduction: The contribution of hazardous noise – a ubiquitous exposure in workplaces – to occupational injury risk is often overlooked. In this cross-sectional study, the fraction of US workplace acute injuries in 2019 attributable to hazardous occupational noise exposure was estimated. Methods: Using the NoiseJEM, a job exposure matrix of occupational noise, and 2019 Occupational Employment and Wage Statistics data, the proportion of workers experiencing hazardous occupational noise (≥85 dBA) was estimated for every major US Standard Occupational Classification (SOC) group. Population attributable fractions (PAFs) were calculated for each major SOC group using the relative risk (RR) taken from a published 2017 meta-analysis on this relationship. Results: About 20.3 million workers (14%) experience hazardous occupational noise. Nearly 3.4% of acute injuries in 2019 (95% CI: 2.4%, 4.4%) were attributable to hazardous occupational noise. Discussion: This suggests hazardous noise exposure at work is an important and modifiable factor associated with a substantial acute occupational injury burden.

Speakers
AS

Abas Shkembi, B.S.

Graduate Student Research Assistant, University of Michigan
Abas Shkembi, BS, is a Research Associate and first-year M.S. student in Industrial Hygiene at the University of Michigan School of Public Health Department of Environmental Health Sciences. Abas has a B.S. in Statistics and has gained significant experience integrating multiple large... Read More →


Saturday February 12, 2022 3:00pm - 8:00pm CST
Virtual

3:00pm CST

Implications of Sampling Theory on Acoustic Impulse-Noise Measurement and Damage Risk Criteria
For impulsive noise, such as produced by weapons fire, it is often suggested that sampling rates of at least 200 kHz are necessary (e.g., MIL-STD-1474E) to accurately estimate the damage risk. In many cases, the driving motivation for this high sampling rate is to ensure a high level of temporal resolution in the impulse waveform. However, the Nyquist-Shannon sampling theorem specifies that a sampled signal can accurately reconstruct both the amplitude and phase information of a signal as long as the sampling rate is at least twice the highest frequency present in the original analog signal. Thus, it is possible to reconstruct a band-limited signal with the same temporal resolution as one captured at a higher sampling rate if the contributions of energy above the Nyquist rate can be ignored. Here we show how resampling techniques can be applied to a signal sampled at 48 kHz to extract A-weighted peak pressure estimates within 0.2 dB of those obtained at a higher sampling rate. The results suggest that sampling rates for impulsive noise should be based on the range of frequencies that are expected to make a meaningful contribution to the risk of injury, rather than on concerns about temporal resolution.

Speakers
avatar for Douglas Brungart, Ph.D

Douglas Brungart, Ph.D

Dr. Brungart serves as Chief Scientist for the Audiology and Speech Center at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center. The ASC provides clinical care which includes audiology and speech/language pathology services in addition, research conducted in the Scientific and Clinical... Read More →
CS

Christopher Smalt, Ph.D

Technical Staff, MIT Lincoln Laboratory
Dr. Smalt is a technical staff member in the Human Health & Performance Systems Group at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Lincoln Laboratory. His current work focuses on computational modeling of hearing damage mechanisms and the effect of noise exposure on hearing and cognitive... Read More →


Saturday February 12, 2022 3:00pm - 8:00pm CST
Virtual

3:00pm CST

Jet-fuel exposures and Central Auditory Nervous System Difficulties
Central Auditory Nervous System Dysfunction (CANSD) can manifest hearing difficulty in the absence of audiometric abnormalities. Effects of jet-fuel exposure to the CANS have been extensively studied in animal models and preliminarily in humans. This study aimed to investigate pure-tone audiometric thresholds, annual noise exposures (ANEs), and modified Amsterdam Inventory for Auditory Disability (mAIAD) responses that may suggest CANSD secondary to jet-fuel and noise exposures. A total of 48 age and sex matched participants were recruited: 24 were Military Bulk Fuel Specialists and 24 were military personnel without jet-fuel exposure. All participants completed the mAIAD, the Noise Exposure Questionnaire, and automated pure-tone air conduction audiometry, speech audiometry, and tympanometry. Results revealed non-significant differences in pure-tone thresholds between groups; consistently and markedly lower mAIAD scores for the jet-fuel group compared to the control group; significantly different ANEs whereby the jet-fuel group had higher noise exposures compared to the control group. Nevertheless, no correlation between mAIAD scores and ANE existed. Overall, the jet-fuel group had lower mAIAD scores, specifically in the speech-in-noise (SIN) subdomain, and higher ANE scores than the controls. Results support that reduced SIN scores are the most prominent mAIAD differentiator between participants who had jet-fuel exposure and the controls.

Speakers
avatar for Laura Dreisbach Hawe, Ph.D

Laura Dreisbach Hawe, Ph.D

Associate Professor, San Diego State University
Laura Dreisbach Hawe is a certified Audiologist and Associate Professor in the School of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences at San Diego State University. She obtained a Ph.D. in Audiology and Hearing Sciences from Northwestern University, where her studies involved the objective... Read More →
OW

O'Neil W. Guthrie, Ph.D

Dr. Oneil W. Guthrie received his B.S. and M.S. degrees from the State University of New York campuses at Geneseo and Fredonia. He completed research training in molecular biology and audiology at the University of Pittsburgh where he earned a Ph.D. He then completed postdoctoral... Read More →
TM

Tanner Miller, MD

Lieutenant Tanner Miller is currently a fourth year otolaryngology resident at Naval Medical Center San Diego. After internship training, he served as a Naval Flight Surgeon for three years completing training at the Naval Aeronautical Medical Institute. Active research interests... Read More →
SM

Sara Murphy, MPH

Ms. Sara Murphy serves as a contract Regional Research Coordinator/Administrator for the Defense Hearing Center of Excellence. Ms. Murphy facilitates auditory and vestibular research collaborations in the Pacific Southwest, including grantsmanship activities, protocol development... Read More →
CS

Caroline Schlocker, MD

Caroline Messmer Schlocker, MD is an otolaryngologist-otologist at Naval Medical Center Readiness and Training Command, San Diego, CA and Commander in the United States Navy Medical Corps. She is an assistant professor of surgery at the Uniformed Services University of Health Sci... Read More →


Saturday February 12, 2022 3:00pm - 8:00pm CST
Virtual

3:00pm CST

Resolved Tinnitus in A Touring Audio Engineer: A Case Study
This case study illustrates tinnitus amelioration during COVID-related lockdown in a patient with hearing loss and persistent tinnitus associated with decades of occupational exposure to amplified music. The patient, a 28-year-old touring audio engineer, first reported longstanding tinnitus in 2017 at a hearing conservation appointment. He was subsequently seen in 2018 he reiterated the presence of persistent tinnitus. In March 2020, he experienced a significant break from sound exposure as COVID restrictions immobilized the music industry. In early March 2020, he was diagnosed with COVID-19 and he experienced a myriad of severe symptoms. However, on March 26th, 2020, he experienced a total and complete remission of his tinnitus. While the change in tinnitus was profound and unexpected, his audiometric thresholds remained unchanged. Therefore, an explanation for the change in tinnitus must consider factors outside those amenable to typical audiometry. Through the remainder of 2020, the patient’s “noise” exposure essentially ceased, his diet and quality of sleep improved, even as he reported severe depression. This patient’s experience appears to provide a counterpoint to the intuitive link between tinnitus severity, activity restriction, and emotional distress.

Speakers
avatar for Heather Malyuk, AuD

Heather Malyuk, AuD

Owner, Soundcheck Audiology
Dr. Heather Malyuk, owner of Soundcheck Audiology, is a musician and audiologist who hails from Northeast Ohio, but is known internationally as a clinician and public speaker in the field of music audiology. Heather grew up in a musical family and since the age of 2 has been singing... Read More →


Saturday February 12, 2022 3:00pm - 8:00pm CST
Virtual

3:00pm CST

Song of the Starbird: Educational Game to Promote STEM and Hearing Health
Song of the Starbird is an educational web-based game designed to support the nationally recognized need to encourage and enhance education in the Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) area and promote hearing health in 4-5th grade students. The primary objective of the game is to develop children’s scientific knowledge base about hearing science and acoustics; the secondary objective is to leverage this knowledge to develop positive attitudes and behaviors related to their own hearing health. The fun and engaging game has 5-levels and is based upon the Dangerous Decibels® program and activities. Initial development of the game is complete and formative evaluation has been conducted on 4-5th grade students, teachers, and high school students. This presentation will introduce the game and accompanying classroom teacher materials along with a request for wider dissemination to gain game functionality feedback from the attendees.

Speakers
OC

Odile Clavier, Ph.D.

Dr. Odile Clavier received her bachelor’s degree from Florida Tech and her master’s and Ph.D. from Stanford University in the department of Aeronautics and Astronautics. Since joining Creare, she has been the Principal Investigator for several biomedical applications. She has... Read More →
ZD

Zara Downs, BFA

Ms. Zara Downs is a game designer and the co-founder of Strangeheart, LLC, an independent game studio. Prior to founding Strangeheart, she was a game designer at Tiltfactor, LLC, an interdisciplinary innovation studio dedicated to designing and studying games for social impact where... Read More →
DM

Deanna Meinke, Ph.D.

Professor, University of Northern Colorado
Deanna Meinke received her undergraduate degree in communication disorders from Colorado State University and a master’s degree in Audiology from Northern Illinois University. She holds a Ph.D. from the University of Colorado in Audiology and is currently a Winchester Distinguished... Read More →
avatar for Mattheus Ueckermann, Ph.D.

Mattheus Ueckermann, Ph.D.

Engineer, Creare, LLC
Dr. Ueckermann received his bachelor’s degree from the University of Waterloo in Canada, and his master’s and Ph.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Mechanical and Computational Engineering. His graduate research focused on developing new finite element methods... Read More →
JW

John Walthour, M.S.

Mr. Walthour received a B.S. from Norwich University and an M.S. from Syracuse University, both in Computer Engineering. His interests span the computing stack, from user interfaces and networking to digital logic design. At SRC Inc., he developed software for radar and electronic... Read More →


Saturday February 12, 2022 3:00pm - 8:00pm CST
Virtual

3:00pm CST

The Effects of Noise Source Locations on Listener’s Acceptable Noise Level (ANL)
Research has shown that listeners had a better understanding of speech when it is presented in front of them at their standing or sitting position (0o azimuth). Therefore, it is necessary to study noise source locations. This study investigated four-noise source locations on listener ANL. The noise source azimuths considered in this study are 45o, 180o, 225o, and 315o to the sitting position of the listener, while the signal is presented at 0o azimuth. Twenty-three subjects (female=12, male =11) participated in the study. Participants' age ranged from 18 to 43 years (M=24 years, SD=6.7); and all participants had normal hearing. A multi-talker noise stimulus was used in the study. The noise source at 180o azimuth had the smallest ANL average compared with the other azimuths. Meaning that listeners accepted more noise without being tensed, at 180o azimuth location to the signal source presented. At 315o azimuth, the noise effect was greater on the listener’s ability to be focused. However, the differences in the average ANLs were not statistically significant. Findings from this study are applicable in the construction sites or factory where different machine produces different noise at different locations to the worker working position.

Speakers
avatar for BANKOLE FASANYA, Ph.D

BANKOLE FASANYA, Ph.D

Assistant Professor, Purdue University Northwest
Dr. Fasanya has more than 12 years of experience in noise control and auditory process research. His long-term research interests involve the development of a comprehensive model and guidelines to reduce environmental hazards and to improve human safety and health in the environment... Read More →


Saturday February 12, 2022 3:00pm - 8:00pm CST
Virtual

3:00pm CST

The importance of perceived temporary threshold shifts in hearing conservation programs
Traditional hearing conservation programs are based on the assumption that individuals who do not experience permanent threshold shifts do not experience long-term damage from noise exposure. However, previous data from animal models suggest that temporary threshold shifts (TTS) can cause permanent damage that may not be detectable with pure tone audiometric thresholds. In the current study, 10,000 Service Members (SM) were asked to report how frequently they experienced changes in hearing (dull or muffled sound) after exposure to a loud noise and the longest amount of time these symptoms persisted after a noise exposure. Roughly 35% of SMs reported that they never experienced TTS symptoms, and this group outperformed all others on a variety of subjective and objective measures of hearing health. Slight but significant decreases in these measures were found for individuals reporting TTS once or a few times in their lifetime. The measures were substantially degraded for approximately 10% of SMs who reported experiencing TTS once per year or more. Here we discuss the implications that self-reported TTS may have as an indicator of hearing damage for individuals in hearing conservation programs with normal hearing thresholds.

Speakers
avatar for Douglas Brungart, Ph.D

Douglas Brungart, Ph.D

Dr. Brungart serves as Chief Scientist for the Audiology and Speech Center at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center. The ASC provides clinical care which includes audiology and speech/language pathology services in addition, research conducted in the Scientific and Clinical... Read More →


Saturday February 12, 2022 3:00pm - 8:00pm CST
Virtual

3:00pm CST

Threshold shift trends in occupational hearing conservation programs: 1970 to 2019
The last 50 years have witnessed regulatory, technological, and demographic changes that impact occupational hearing conservation programs (HCPs) in the U.S. This presentation describes trends in threshold shifts observed in a database of over 600,000 exams (> 140,000 workers) between 1970 and 2020. Unadjusted rates of standard threshold shifts (STS) declined from over 50% of tested workers through the 1980s to 13% from 2010-2019. Recently, the median time from baseline to initial STS trigger was around 2 years; 25% of initial STS trigger events occurred in year 1. Given the short time between baseline and initial STS triggers, enhanced efforts to identify problems in the first few years in the hearing conservation program (e.g., insufficient education and training; inadequate hearing protector selection, fitting, or use; inadequate engineering controls) could lead to additional reductions in rates of threshold shifts among noise exposed workers.

Speakers
avatar for Gregory Flamme, Ph.D.

Gregory Flamme, Ph.D.

Senior Scientist, SASRAC
Dr. Gregory Flamme is the Senior Scientist and Chief Operating Officer of Stephenson and Stephenson Research and Consulting (SASRAC), which is a company founded by Dr. Mark Stephenson and Dr. Carol Stephenson. Dr. Flamme has a Ph.D. in Audiology from the University of Memphis, completed... Read More →
DM

Deanna Meinke, Ph.D.

Professor, University of Northern Colorado
Deanna Meinke received her undergraduate degree in communication disorders from Colorado State University and a master’s degree in Audiology from Northern Illinois University. She holds a Ph.D. from the University of Colorado in Audiology and is currently a Winchester Distinguished... Read More →
MS

Mark Stephenson, Ph.D.

Dr. Mark Stephenson is the owner and principal consultant for Stephenson and Stephenson Research and Consulting (SASRAC). He received his Ph.D. in audiology and hearing science from The Ohio State University in 1986. Mark was a Lt. Colonel in the U.S. Air Force, where he served until... Read More →
ST

Stephen Tasko, Ph.D.

Dr. Stephen Tasko is an Associate Professor Emeritus in the Department of Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences at Western Michigan University and Research Consultant with Stephenson and Stephenson Research and Consulting (SASRAC). Dr. Tasko earned his Ph.D. in Communication Disorders... Read More →


Saturday February 12, 2022 3:00pm - 8:00pm CST
Virtual

3:00pm CST

Using Boothless Audiometry in the Clinic (and out) to Enhance hearing Readiness
In response to COVID-19, which significantly hindered hearing readiness in the U.S. Army, boothless audiometers were incorporated into the Army Hearing Program to perform hearing exams outside the audio booth and Defense Occupational and Environmental Health Readiness System – Hearing Conservation (DOEHRS-HC). Here, we will discuss new standard operating procedures developed to utilize boothless audiometry in a DoD Hearing Conservation Program, the challenges faced, and an evaluation of the program effectiveness in terms of hearing readiness and the potential return on investment. Initial results indicate our boothless audiometry test protocol was just as reliable as the standard of care. We will also highlight advantages of this boothless system in comparison to the legacy system by its ability to (1) reduce referrals due to masking and/or tinnitus (2) provide targeted hearing health education and training, and (3) bring audiometric testing to the unit. While the utilization of boothless audiometry during this public health crisis has been successful to meet the mission to maintain a medically ready force, innovations as a direct result from this endeavor highlight several additional improvements in comparison to current standards of care that should be considered for permanent inclusion in DoD Hearing Conservation Programs.

Speakers
avatar for Douglas Brungart, Ph.D

Douglas Brungart, Ph.D

Dr. Brungart serves as Chief Scientist for the Audiology and Speech Center at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center. The ASC provides clinical care which includes audiology and speech/language pathology services in addition, research conducted in the Scientific and Clinical... Read More →
avatar for Benjamin Sheffield, MSc

Benjamin Sheffield, MSc

Auditory Research Engineer, US Army Public Health Center
Mr. Sheffield holds dual degrees in Electrical and Mechanical Engineering. After a four year stint working in the defense industry, he got his start in auditory research as a volunteer in a hearing and speech lab while in graduate school at UC Irvine. He now has 14 years of experience... Read More →


Saturday February 12, 2022 3:00pm - 8:00pm CST
Virtual

3:00pm CST

Using true wireless earphones to support accurate audiometric tests in non-clinical settings – preliminary validation
Hearing loss is an increasingly serious problem not only for the elderly but also for the young.To achieve timely identification and management, many internet-based or smartphone-based test systems were proposed. However, conducting accurate audiometric tests outside sound booths introduces several challenges, such as ambient noise and stimuli level control, and mitigation of human errors. This study presents an approach to support multiple hearing tests in non-clinical settings with acceptable accuracy by using wireless earphones. Firstly, both earphones and over-the-ear earmuffs were used simultaneously, the ambient noise was reduced by the cushions of earphone and by the earmuff. Secondly, each earphone was calibrated during manufacturing to ensure design specifications such as frequency responses and tolerance ranges were met. The relationship between dBFS and dBSPL corresponding to a 2cc coupler measurement system was stored in the Bluetooth chip, and a protocol was developed for the host device to retrieve the conversion data from the earphone. Thirdly, the host device can accurately control the level of test stimuli played by the earphones through the Audio/Video Remote Control Profile. Results indicate that the output level error can be less than 1.5 dB, and maximum difference between different earphones was less than 2 dB.

Speakers
TL

Tai lien Chiang, Bachelor

master degree student, Mackay Medical College
v clinical experience in Mackay Memorial Hospital as audiologist from audiology and vestibular assessment to cochlear implant mapping v trying to figure out how to efficiently promote hearing care information in Taiwan, especially to elders v I am now a master degree student who major... Read More →


Saturday February 12, 2022 3:00pm - 8:00pm CST
Virtual

3:00pm CST

Validation of Electromechanical Hearing Protection Evaluation Methods
Preventing hearing injury while maintaining situational awareness is of critical importance to Soldiers and operational planners. As the modern military encounters a variety of complex situations, determining the optimal hearing protection device (HPD) in each case is a non-trivial task. Currently, only the Noise Reduction Rating (NRR) is used as a standard HPD specification; other important characteristics of advanced HPDs are not evaluated or reported in a standardized manner. Most HPD performance evaluation is done using human subjects, and commercially available HPDs present more options than can be reasonably evaluated. To address this challenge, a suite of quantitative, sensor-based tests to quickly, inexpensively, and comprehensively evaluate candidate HPDs is being developed for military use. The five tests consist of metrics regarding signal quality, sound localization, level-dependent frequency response, self-noise for active electronic devices, and impulse noise response. Electromechanical metric results will be correlated with human subject trials, which are still in early stages; however, preliminary results will be presented and compared with the complimentary electromechanical methods. An overview of the software tool under development for use by operational planners to select the optimal HPD for their missions will also be given.

Speakers
avatar for Theodore Argo, Ph.D

Theodore Argo, Ph.D

Principal Scientist, Applied Research Associates
An acoustic scientist with experience in research into human hearing injury, hearing protection devices, instrumentation, and fast-running physics-based numerical code development. Dr. Argo has led development of human hearing studies focusing on laboratory methods for evaluation... Read More →
AB

Andrew Brown, Ph.D

Dr. Brown is an Assistant Professor of Speech and Hearing Sciences and an Adjunct Assistant Professor of Psychology at the University of Washington. Dr. Brown’s research is focused on the topic of spatial hearing. Current projects evaluate impacts of hearing devices, including hearing... Read More →
NG

Nate Greene, Ph.D

Dr. Greene’s research focuses on the mechanics and physiology of the auditory system and hearing. His lab focuses on the effects of using hearing restoration devices, as well as the mechanisms of hearing loss during high level sound exposure. Studies on hearing restoration devices... Read More →
CM

Caylin McCallick, AuD

Dr. Caylin McCallick is a Senior Professional Research Assistant in the Department of Otolaryngology at the University of Colorado, Anschutz Medical Campus. Dr. McCallick completed her Bachelor of Arts degree in Communicative Sciences and Disorders with a minor in Psychology at Saint... Read More →
GR

Greg Rule

Mr. Rule is an experienced prior military officer with a reputation for building, developing, and managing teams to achieve challenging goals under severe personnel and budget constraints. Mr. Rule serves as a technical and project management lead for Applied Research Associates on... Read More →
CS

Carol Sammeth, Ph.D

Dr. Sammeth has more than 30 years of experience working as a researcher, professor, teacher, and clinician in audiology and hearing science, including holding faculty positions at several major universities and schools of medicine. She has also worked as a regulatory specialist... Read More →


Saturday February 12, 2022 3:00pm - 8:00pm CST
Virtual